Forum Fisheries nations express condolences on passing of Nauru Fisheries Minister Valdon Dowiyogo

WCPFC13, Denarau, Nadi, FIJI ISLANDS: Friday 9th Dec 2016Forum Fisheries Agency, FFA member nations have expressed condolences this morning at the sudden passing of Nauru's Minister of Fisheries, Hon. Valdon Dowiyogo. 
 
The 48-year old son of former President Bernard Dowiyogo had been on an official visit to Russia at the time of his death, early yesterday.
 
Dowiyogo had been MP for Ubenide since 2003, and was Speaker of the Parliament of Nauru from 2005 until his appointment in 2013 to President Baron Waqa's cabinet, holding the Fisheries portfolio as well as those of Health, Transport and Sports.
 
“It’s with great sadness that we honour the support and leadership of Valdon Dowiyogo as one of the youngest members of the Forum Fisheries Ministerial group,” says FFA Director General James Movick.
 
“His passing is a loss to his family and nation, as well as the regional groupings like the FFA’s Ministerial membership, where he was always an engaging and enquiring leader seeking the best for his people and region.”
 
“We send sympathy and condolences to his beloved wife Euphemia and family, and to the people of Nauru, and his cabinet and parliamentary colleagues, at this time of sadness and remembrance.
 
“The Pacific has lost a leader, gone too soon, and remembered with gratitude.”--ENDS
 
 ABOUT FFA:
The Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) strengthens national capacity and regional solidarity so its 17 members can manage, control and develop their tuna fisheries now and in the future. Based in Honiara, Solomon Islands, FFA's 17 Pacific Island members are Australia, Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.  Since 1979, FFA has facilitated regional cooperation so that all Pacific countries benefit from the sustainable use of tuna – a multi-billion dollar resource important for many people’s livelihoods in the Pacific.